The way it moves

Charlotte Pearson discovers a range of jewellery where each item is a work of art.

Throughout our lives we are defined by labels – student, mother, artist or chef are perfect examples.
It is something that when someone asks ‘what do you do?’ gives them a brief glimpse into our lives.

John

John

However, not everyone is keen to be defined in this way.
“I see myself as an artist who makes wearable objects rather than a jewellery designer,” says John Moore.
“I think that you shouldn’t worry about labels. I have felt more free since I decided not to classify myself as a jeweller or the like.
“It is something I would say to any future artist – that it is fine to change your mind and do something else.
“You don’t have to be pigeonholed by anyone.”
Growing up, John’s father was a painter and his mother designed jewellery and he admits from a young age he was always creative, making puppets and theatres.
At school and college his love for art grew and saw him head to university to study 3D design where he worked in a range of different mediums.
It was while studying that John discovered the metal he uses in his jewellery.
“I use anodised aluminium because when I was a student it was relatively cheap and light,” he explains.
“I still use it now as I love the colours you can get and the way it moves.
“My items are very tactile and I want people to be able to play and move them.”

Vane collection Picture: Chris Bulezuik

Vane collection Picture: Chris Bulezuik

Wanting to be able to exhibit at the Goldsmiths’ Fair in London, John has started to incorporate precious metals into his pieces but finds it can make them heavier.
“I am also starting to look at using other materials like wood but I am very aware of the weight and that it has to be wearable for someone,” says John.
The movement of his work is something which is illustrated in his collaboration with choreographer Jenna Lee.
“I believe in the universe giving you a push in the right direction,” smiles John.
“My brother is a ballet dancer based in Switzerland and when he came home he went to a party and asked me to go.
“I met Jenna there, she is a former English National Ballet soloist, and she suggested working together.”
What started as something small with some pictures of dancer Nancy Osbaldeston (demi-soloist with the Royal Ballet of Flanders, and former ENB soloist) wearing some of John’s creations organically grew into something more.
“We got in touch with Brighton filmmakers asking if they wanted something for their portfolio and got an amazing response,” explains John.
“The director of photography was Josh Cowdry, the pictures are great but to see the movement was just spectacular I loved seeing the pieces come to life on someone.
“I asked a friend who is in the band GAPS if they wanted to do the music for it and they loved it so much it turned into the video for their single A World Away.
“It was a great and something I would love to do more of.”

Images from Verto video Picture: Ellen Alberti

Images from Verto video Picture: Ellen Alberti

Two necklaces were used with one using about 90 discs and taking John about two weeks to make.
John has already worked with Jenna on another project creating animal heads using the foam swimming floats are made from.
“It can be heated up and moulded and is really light weight so the wearer doesn’t realise they have it on,” explains John.
“Jenna used them in a production of Alice in Wonderland.
“It started as I made a mouse head for a festival I was going to.”
For John, inspiration comes from a range of places.
“I am inspired by the books I read as a child like the fantasy element of Lord of the Rings, I like the idea of a piece of jewellery being magical and giving the wearer magical powers,” smiles John.
“Nature has always interested me as well I like the patterns in things like feathers, fish scales and insects.
“I feel you can never really match the beauty of nature so I see my work as paying homage to it.”
With a number of ideas for things he would like to do in the future it will be interesting to see what he does next.

The collections…

Electyra

Elytra

“Elytra is about the movement of it so it can be worn two ways,” explains John. “The movement means it works great with earrings but not as a ring it doesn’t have the same effect.
“Elytra means beetle wings.
“With the Vane range the discs reminded me of how the bits come off the shaft of a feather.”

John is based at New England House, New England Street, Brighton To view the collections visit www.johnmoorejewellery.com and you can also follow him on Instagam by searching @johnmjewellery

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admin October 26, 2016 Fashion and Beauty